Proposed ATV Route 2012

The following is what I submitted to the City in May about the Proposed ATV Route 2012

My comments were referenced by Michelle Hendry, Director of Public Works at a Special Council meeting October 2, 2012.

My comments were after initial review and consultation with staff. I tried as much as possible to limit my comments to be exclusively from a policing/public safety perspective.

I also attached from referenced material:

  • HKPR Report re On-Road Operation of ATVs
  • ATV Safety Report – Wisconsin
  • MTO – Operating an ATV in Ontario

 __________________________________________________________________________________

Comments

 

  • I have attached research from HKPR District Health Unit – they reference research that states: “manufacturers’ operating instructions and ATV industry organizations confirm that a route which allows ATVs to operate on pavement, on the side of public roads and/or with the regular flow of vehicular traffic, poses a verified risk for ATV operators and other road users.”;
  • Further research from The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) Wisconsin – they state: “ATVs should not be driven on paved roads. ATVs on paved roads are at risk of being hit by cars and other vehicles. While passenger vehicles contain safety features designed to protect occupants from collisions, ATVs do not. If struck by other vehicles, ATV riders can be killed or severely injured.”;
  • Having referenced the above the MTO has rules for that type of use and allows Municipalities to create By-Laws to regulate on road use;
  • On this proposed route an ATV would have to be operated as a “car” and drive with traffic occupying a lane;
  • I would anticipate increased calls to our Police Service responding to complaints from residents/businesses about ATVs speeding, noise, parking on private property, ATVs leaving route etc…;
  • I would also predict an increase in vehicle collisions based purely on increased vehicle volume alone, and anticipated frustrated drivers passing ATVs (in some cases multiple ATVs);
  • Having said that the OPP have had no problems with the ATV trail through Fenelon Falls.  They have laid one (1) charge for an ATV driving off the trail.  No complaints about the trail. I haven’t compared the routes re distance, traffic volume, intersections etc…;
  • Significant signage of route would be required for ATVs and road traffic (I would like to be consulted on this);
  • Consider limiting the number of ATVs travelling together reducing the impact on motorists;
  • It would be helpful to add no parking areas on some of the streets  during the ATV season;
  • KATVA Wardens would have to be utilized at entrances/exits to ensure compliance;
  • Prior to implementation, KATVA Trial permits should be reviewed (by legal) to  ensure the municipality’s liability is waived;
  • In Town I would want The By-Law Department to be primarily responsible for responding to and managing complaints;
  • We would be utilized to speeding enforcement, possible criminal enforcement (impaired driving), and occasional By-Law enforcement;
  • If the Municipality proceeds I would recommend a May 1, 2013 – November 30, 2013 trial to allow for signs to be developed and installed (unless that can be expedited).

 

KATVA rules that would have to be followed:

  • Must have KATVA (or reciprocal) Permit in their possession;
  • ATV use is – MAY 1-NOV 30, between hours of 7:00am-9:30pm.


Summarized Research

 HKPR District Health Unit

With regard to allowing road access for ATVs, the HKPR District Health Unit believes the most important factor is safety and the best outcome will be achieved when the municipality implements a decision that minimizes the risk of injury and death.

Based on the research available, collisions on roads and highways are known to be a significant source of injury and death for ATV users and often involve collision with another vehicle.

The Health Unit acknowledges the need for appropriate places for ATV riding but encourages ATV users to maximize their safety by primarily using managed trails systems.

Credible research, manufacturers’ operating instructions and ATV industry organizations confirm that a route which allows ATVs to operate on pavement, on the side of public roads and/or with the regular flow of vehicular traffic, poses a verified risk for ATV operators and other road users.

Source: Haliburton Kawartha Pine Ridge District Health Unit Report “On-Road Operation of All Terrain Vehicles” October 2009

 

Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) Wisconsin

ATVs should not be driven on paved roads. ATVs on paved roads are at risk of being hit by cars and other vehicles. While passenger vehicles contain safety features designed to protect occupants from collisions, ATVs do not. If struck by other vehicles, ATV riders can be killed or severely injured.

In addition, most ATVs have low pressure tires and a solid rear axle, where both wheels turn at the same speed. When making a turn, the ATV’s inside rear wheel is intended to skid because its path length is less than the path length of the outside wheel. ATVs on paved surfaces have much better traction, which prevents the necessary skidding. This can make turning an ATV on paved surfaces unpredictable and unstable.

The CPSC’s concerns are echoed by the Specialty Vehicle Institute of America, a not-for-profit association dedicated to ATV safety. SVIA takes this position: “ATVs are not designed, manufactured, or in any way intended for use on public streets, roads or highways. [SVIA] urges that on-highway use of ATVs be prohibited and law enforcement efforts be strengthened to eliminate this dangerous practice.”

Source: Wisconsin Department of Transportation report “On-Road Operation of ATVs” June 2009

 

The info below is from a MTO document that would provide a resource for regulating this.

On-Road Use

  • An ATV that has four wheels (all of which contact the ground), is equipped with steering handlebars, a seat designed to be straddled by the driver, and is designed for a driver only and no passenger, is permitted to travel along some provincial highways.
  • It must weigh 450 kilograms or less and have an overall width not greater than 1.35 m.
  • An ATV that has the above features is prohibited from operating on a municipal road, unless the

Municipality has a bylaw permitting the use of ATVs.

  • An ATV must be registered and insured as outlined in “Off-Road Use” section.
  • Driver must be at least 16 years of age and hold a valid G2/ M2 licence or greater.
  • Driver must wear an approved motorcycle helmet.
  • Passengers are prohibited.
  • An ATV driver must travel at speeds that are less than the posted speed limit. The maximum speed an ATV can travel on roads with a limit of 50 km/hr or less is 20 km/hr, and the maximum speed on roads with a limit of more than 50 km/hr is 50 km/hr. Municipalities may set lower speed limits or additional rules for ATVs.
  • An ATV must be driven in the same direction as traffic and travel on the shoulder of the road. If the shoulder is unsafe or impassable, it can be driven on the travelled portion of the road.
  • An ATV travelling along a road must have its headlights and tail lights on.

Source: Ontario Ministry of Transportation web page document “Operating an ATV in Ontario What You Need to Know”

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s